Diocese of Liaocheng

Bishop Zhao

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Bishop Joseph Fengchang Zhao

The Catholic Church, Huashan Road, Development area, Liaocheng City, Shandong, China Postal Code: 252000

+86-0635-8534077

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Bishop Joseph Zhao Fengchang was born on Feb. 8, 1934. He is a native of Beixinzhuang, Jining county in Shandong. He studied at the St. Joseph Minor Seminary at Zhoucun and the Minor Seminary of St. Augustine in Yanzhou.

Between 1951 and 1952, he had private lessons with priests in Yanzhou. He became a teacher of a primary school and had private lessons with priests in Jining again after his resignation of a teacher. In 1958, he studied theology and philosophy at Holy Spirit Major Seminary in Jinan.

During the political turmoils since the 1950s, he stayed at home and was a farmer from 1962-1983. When the Cultural Revolution was over, he studied at the National Seminary in Beijing from 1983 to 1985 and was ordained a priest upon graduation. He served in Jining from 1985 to 1996 and since then he was the spiritual director of the Holy Spirit Major Seminary.

In 1999, the Church authorities in Beijing combined Yanggu diocese and Prefecture Apostolic of Linqing to form Liaocheng diocese and Father Zhao was elected as Bishop of Liaocheng. His Episcopal ordination was the next year with papal approval. However, the Holy See does not recognize the new diocese and regards the prelate as Bishop of Yanggu.

Previous Ordinaries:

  • Prefect Apostolic of Linqing Paul Ly (Nov. 18, 1949 Appointed - 1981 Died)
  • Prefect Apostolic of Linqing Giuseppe Ly (Nov. 22, 1940 Appointed - 1948 Died)
  • Prefect Apostolic of Linqing Gaspare Hou (Hu) (March 30, 1931 Appointed - Oct. 1940 Resigned)
  • Bishop Joseph Li Bingyao, S.V.D (1911-1995)
  • Bishop Thomas Niu Huiqing (1895-1973)
  • Cardinal Thomas Tianshen, S.V.D. (1890-1967)

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