Church in China
  • Capital:
  • Beijing
  • Population:
  • 1.3 billion
  • Catholic:
  • 13 million (1 %)
  • Diocese:
  • 112
  • Major religion:
  • Folk religions and Taoism 30%, Buddhism 18%, Christianity 4%
The earliest documented presence of Christianity in China is seen in Nestorian missioners arriving in the Chinese capital of Chang’an (Xi’an) and accepted by the emperor of Tang Dynasty in 635.

The first Catholic mission to China was led by Franciscan friar Giovanni da Montecorvino, who arrived in the present day Beijing in 1293. Russian Orthodoxy was introduced in 1715 and Protestants began entering China in 1807.
A nationwide survey conducted by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing in 2010 showed there are at least 23 million Protestants across the country, accounting for 1.8 percent of the 1.3 billion people in China.

In the same line, officially, Mainland China has only 6 million Catholics, but Hong Kong diocese's Holy Spirit Study Centre estimates that China has some 12 million Catholics, including the "unregistered" Catholics who reject the government-sanctioned Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association.

  • Capital:
  • Beijing
  • Population:
  • 1.3 billion
  • Catholic:
  • 13 million (1 %)
  • Diocese:
  • 112
  • Major religion:
  • Folk religions and Taoism 30%, Buddhism 18%, Christianity 4%
Christians' charity and social services actions are seen imporatant in the social welfare of the naiton. In recent years, being less suspicious about NGOs, the government encourages religions to participate more in social services.

China has no official diplomatic relations with the Vatican after the Communist Party took over the reigns of the Mainland in 1949.  The country has more than 100 dioceses but it does not have a Vatican-recognized bishops’ conference or an official Catholic directory directory so far.

The split between the “unregistered” Church community and the government-approved “open” Church community has made the hierarchical issues more complicated. The “unregistered” Catholics follow the Church hierarchy before 1949, but many provincial borders have changed over the decades.

Moreover, the "open” Church community now reorganizes certain dioceses and without distinguishing archdioceses while the Vatican does not recognize some of the newly created dioceses. Political reality makes the diocesan directory for China extremely difficult to compile. UCAN directory will follow the current practice of only naming the ordinary as “bishop” and provide directory of dioceses that is prevalent among mainland Catholics.

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Municipality
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Beijing

Chongqing

Shanghai

Tianjin

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Province
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Anhui Province

Fujian Province

Gansu Province

Guangdong Province

Guizhou Province

Hainan Province

Heilongjiang Province

Jilin Province

Liaoning Province

Nei Mongol Province

Zhejiang Province

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Autonomous Region
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Ningxia Hui

Xinjiang Uyghur

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Special Administrative Region
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Hong Kong

Macau