Archdiocese of Delhi
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15.5 million people residing in the area that the archdiocese covers i.e. the entire state of Delhi and eight districts of Haryana. At present the Archdiocese of Delhi comprises the State of Delhi and the districts of Gurgaon, Rohtak, Mahendragarh, Sonepat, Faridabad, Nuh, Jhajjar and Rewari of Haryana.

Suffragan dioceses are Jammu-Srinagar, Jullundur and Simla and Chandigarh.

Population

The people of the Union Territory of Delhi comprise a large number of migrants from different states of the country, particularly for the nearer ones, like Haryana and Uttar Pradesh. It also has a large number of refuges who came to Delhi in 1947, soon after the Partition on India. As the city developed and the employment opportunities increased, the number of migrants also grew and the population now has raised to almost our time in comparison to the figure of nearly five decades ago. Today, it stands at more than nineteen million people. Along with the increase in the migration of the general population, the migration of Christians too increased.

To solve the problem of congestion, more attention is being paid now to develop satellite town and a new Planning Body has set up for what is called the National Capital Region which takes into consideration all the towns within a radius of about 80 kilometers. In terms of economics, Delhi has a mixture of both the very rich and the very poor with a growing middle class mostly engaged in various services. On the 12 million people of Delhi, over two million live in slums.

Various industries that had developed over the past two or three decades are now being shifted to the satellite town of the neighboring states. By and large, people of different faith, states, languages and cultures live together in peace, though occasionally there are communal riots and clashes which rarely go out of control.

History

The history proper of the Archdiocese of Delhi actually begins on June 4, 1959. However, Christian presence in the territory of Delhi and the surrounding areas can be traced back to around 1626.

In spite of the shortage of priests, the Archdiocese of Delhi-Simla made sufficient progress and on June 4, 1959, the Archdiocese was bifurcated into two separate ecclesiastical units, viz. diocese of Simla -Chandigarh and Archdiocese of Delhi and both were handed over to the diocesan clergy. While Archbishop Joseph Fernandes was renamed the Archbishop of Delhi, Msgr. John Burke, the then vicar General of Delhi Archdiocese, was consecrated on November 1, 1959, as the first bishop of the newly carved out diocese of Simla-Chandigarh. On the same day, Father Angelo Fernandes, the then administrator of Holy Name Cathedral, Bombay, was appointed Coadjutor Archbishop of Delhi.

At the time of the bifurcation in 1959, the Archdiocese of Delhi had only 10 churches. In spite of these limitations, a planned growth for the Archdiocese was envisaged by the then Archbishop Joseph Fernandes and his coadjutor Archbishop Angelo Fernandes who succeeded him in 1967.

At present the Archdiocese of Delhi comprises the State of the Capital Territory of Delhi and the seven civil districts of Haryana, namely, Gurgaon, Rohtak, Mahendergarh, Sonepat, Faridabad, Rewari and Jhajjar. Though most of the activities of the Archdiocese were confined to the city, efforts were also made to extend the Church to Haryana. Only Gurgaon had a mission, St. Michael's Church, since 1952. the Sonepat mission was started around 1963. A certain Mr. Sylvester persuaded the Archbishop to start a school. The Sisters of charity of Ss. Bartholomea Capitanio & Vincenza Geroiza, popularly known as Bambino Sisters, opted to go there. They opened the Holy Child School in 1964 in a rented place and later moved to the land purchased for the school, alsong with the land for a church. Though th

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