Apostolic Vicariates of Calapan
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In a land area of 4,364.72 square kilometers, the diocesan territory covers the civil Province of Oriental Mindoro.

Oriental Mindoro is a province of the Philippines located in the island of Mindoro under MIMAROPA region in Luzon, about 140 km southwest of Manila. The province is bordered by the Verde Island Passage and the rest of Batangas to the north, by Marinduque, Maestro del Ocampo Island, Tablas Strait and the rest of Romblon to the east, by Semirara and the rest of Caluya Islands, Antique to the south, and by Occidental Mindoro to the west. Calapan City, the only city in the island, is the provincial capital. The city is a 3rd class city in the province.

Population

The total population of Calapan apostolic vicariate is 707, 676 of which 83 percent are Catholics or equivalent to 681,987.

The indigenous people of Oriental Mindoro are the Mangyans (Manguianes in Spanish, Mañguianes in Old Tagalog), consisting of 7 distinct tribes. They occupy the interior, specially the highlands. Mangyans have inhabited the island since pre-history. They are believed to have originally traveled from Indonesia and settled down for good in the island.

A. Iraya - live in Naujan, Baco, San Teodoro, and Victoria in Oriental Mindoro, and in Mamburao, Sta. Cruz, and Sablayan in Occidental Mindoro. 1. Traditionally, Iraya attire was made from dry tree bark, flattened and softened by pounding, The women wore blouses and skirts, while the men wore cloth g-strings. Today most women wear white one-piece, off-shoulder dresses. 2. Skilled in nito-weaving. Known for their nito baskets, woven into jars, trays, plates, cups and other handicrafts of different sizes and designs.

B. Alangan - live in Naujan, Baco, San Teodoro, and Victoria in Oriental Mindoro, and in Mamburao, Sta. Cruz, and Sablayan in Occidental Mindoro. 1. Women wear a skirt made of long strips of woven nito, wound many times around the lower half of the body. A pounded bark g-string keeps what looks like a "slinky," from falling. The upper covering is made from the leaf of the wild buri palm. For modesty, single girls also wear a red kerchief over this strapless ulango. Men wear woven cloth g-strings with fringes in front. 2. At the middle part of their houses is a "square-like box" which they call palangganan, built one foot lower than the floor. This is used as a fireplace. In an Alangan communal house called balay-lakoy (big house), where about 8-20 nuclear families live, the number of palangganan shows the number of families living in the balay-lakoy. 3. Known for their striking female outfit, rattan weaving and house design

C. Tadyawan - found only in Oriental Mindoro: Naujan, Victoria, Socorro, Pola, Gloria, Pinamalayan, and Bansud. 1. Traditionally, the women wound a red cloth around their chests, and wore a white skirt together with colorful beaded bracelets or necklaces. The men wore g-strings. At present, women are rarely seen wearing their traditional attire, though several men still wear g-strings. 2. Known as skilled hat weavers.

D. Tau-buid - live in Socorro, Pinamalayan and Gloria in Oriental Mindoro, but most of them live in Sablayan and Calintaan in Occidental Mindoro. 1. Standard dress for men and women is the loincloth. In some areas near the lowlands, women wrap a knee-length cloth around their bark bra-string, while some men wear cloth instead of bark. Both sexes wear bark cloth as inner clothing and for headbands, women's breast covers, and blankets. Cloth is made by extracting, pounding and drying the inner bark of several different trees. 2. Known as pipe smokers (even the children begin smoking at a young age) and basket weavers.

E. Bangon - live along the Binagaw River and the surrounding mountains within the municipalities of Bongabong, Bansud, and Gloria in Oriental Mindoro and in Calintaan, San Jose, and Rizal in Occidental Mindoro. 1. Men wear bahag (loincloth), but no recorded traditional attire for women who most likely wore bark cloth like their Tau-buid neighbors. 2. Hunters and farmers who make pipes and winnowing baskets. 3. Formerly considered a subgroup of the Tau-buhid Mangyans, the Bangons insisted on being a separate group because of distinctions in their culture, language, and writing system.

F. Buhid - live in Oriental (Roxas, Bansud, Bongabong and Mansalay) and Occidental (San Jose and Rizal) Mindoro 1. Women wear woven black and white upper coverings and black and white skirts. Unmarried women wear body ornaments such as braided nito belts; blue thread earrings; beaded headbands, bracelets, and long necklaces. Men wear g-strings; tight chokers; or long beaded necklaces and bracelets. Both sexes use a bag for personal items such as combs and knives. 2. Known for their pre-Spanish syllabic writing system; and pottery

G. Hanunuo - the largest and best known of the 8 groups, they live in Mansalay, Bulalacao, and Bongabong in Oriental Mindoro, and in San Jose, Occidental Mindoro.
1. Men wear a bahag and jacket-style shirt; women indigo-dyed ramit skirts which they weave on back strap looms. Their hand-sewn tops are embroidered on the back with a cross-shaped design called pakudos. Both sexes wear twilled rattan belts with pockets around their waist. Men wear their hair long, tied at the back of the head with a cloth band. Women decorate their long hair with beaded headbands. They are fond of wearing beaded bracelets and necklaces. The pakudos design is also found in their jewelry and embroideries, and woven into their baskets and bags made of buri palm leaf and nito black fern.
2. Skilled weavers of cotton and buri, and in blacksmithing.
3. Best known for carving poetry (ambahan) on bamboo plants and slats, in their pre-Spanish syllabary script which is Indic in origin. Also known for their black and beige baskets and their pakudos design.

Language

Oriental Mindoro does not entail memorizing bits of conventional lines in dialects spoken other than Tagalog, which serves as the predominant dialect. Other dialects spoken are Ilocano and Cebuano. Strains of the Mangyan dialect spoken are Arayan, Alagnan, Buhid, Hunuo, and Tadyawan. The working population can read and speak Filipino and English.

History

Suffragan of Lipa
Created Apostolic Prelature: July 2, 1936
Elevated to Apostolic Vicariate: July 12, 1951
Comprises the civil Province of Oriental Mindoro
Titular: Sto. Niño (child Jesus)

First founded by Spanish Agustinian Recollect, Father Diego de la Madre de Dios in 1679, Calapan started as a parish church with built settlements around it later on becoming a small town. These settlements were built near the seashore along Calapan River. The development of the town of Calapan was thus similar to the pattern of town development during the Spanish colonial era where the establishment of residences, town hall and plaza were built around the church under the watchful eyes of the Spanish priests. With the gradual development of Calapan, eventually became the seat of administrative power and the capital of the whole province of Mindoro during the last stages of the Spanish period.

On July 2, 1936 Apostolic Prelature of Calapan was created and Most Rev. William Finneman, SVD, DD was elected first Apostolic Prefect. On June 21, 1946, Most Rev. Enrique (Henry) Ederle, S.V.D. was appointed second apostolic prefect.

The prelature was elevated to apostolic vicariate on July 12, 1951 with Most. Rev. Wilhelm Josef Duschak, S.V.D. appointed first apostolic vicar and on Nov. 26, 1973 Most Rev. Simeon O. Valerio, S.V.D. appointed second apostolic vicar.

On April 28, 1989, then Msgr. Warlito Cajandig was appointed third apostolic vicar. Most Rev. Cajandig is the first diocesan bishop of Calapan whose main thrust is BEC.

History of Calapan City
The name Mindoro was coined from the Spanish term "Mina de Oro" which means "gold mine". This was how Spanish navigators, led by Juan de Salcedo, described the island after they found buried Chinese cargoes with gold threads, jars, silverware and porcelain.

Calapan was formerly a small village before the establishment of the first Religious District in Baco. The District convent was transferred to Calapan in 1733 and began its jurisdiction over the Northern Mindoro Ecclesiastical Area.

In the early 18th century, the town occupied only a strip of land stretching from Ibaba to Ilaya in a cross - formed facing the present church and cut-off by a river. In the course of the century, succeeding barrios were founded.

In 1919, the boundary dispute between Calapan and Naujan was adjudicated by Presidentes Agustin Quijano of Calapan and Agustin Garong of Naujan over a portion of the territory of what is now known as the present boundary. The portion of agricultural area was awarded to Naujan, thus, making the area of Calapan much smaller as compared to that of Naujan which is now considered as the biggest municipality of the province.

At present, Calapan has an area of only 250.06 square kilometers (according to LMB). It has also jurisdiction over the three (3) Baco Islets on the Calapan Bay and the two (2) Silonay Islets.

The derivation of the name of Calapan cannot be traced with certainty. Some opined that it came from the word "Kalap" which means to gather logs. Thus "Kalapan" was supposed to be a place where logs were gathered. In the old records, however, there was never a mention of Calapan as a place where logs were produced or exported. Furthermore, huge forest trees where logs were produced certainly did not grow near the town, which was swampy. Another theory holds that Calapan was originally pronounced as "Kalapang" which, according to an old Tagalog dictionary, was a synonym for "sanga" or branch. It could then refer to the settlement of Kalapang as a branch of its mother town of Baco, an adjoining town. The name was later hispanized as Calapan.

The year 1998 was a landmark event for Calapan when it was converted from a municipality into a component city by virtue of Republic Act No. 8475. The law was authored in Congress by Rep. Renato V. Leviste, signed by President Fidel V. Ramos on Feb. 2, 1998. On March 21, 1998, the people of Calapan ratified the creation of the City of Calapan in a plebiscite marking the same day as the city's foundation day. Incumbent Mayor Arnan C. Panaligan became the last Municipal Mayor and the First City Mayor of the City of Calapan.

Since its creation as a city, Calapan has witnessed significant strides in commerce and industry, infrastructure and social services. New commercial establishments were opened providing employment and income opportunities for the residents. An expanded program on social services delivery, particularly in health care and education, were undertaken. An upgrade of the city's physical structures includes the construction of new roads and drainage facilities and a new City Government Center.

Political

The total population of Calapan apostolic vicariate is 707, 676 of which 83 percent are Catholics or equivalent to 681,987.

The indigenous people of Oriental Mindoro are the Mangyans (Manguianes in Spanish, Mañguianes in Old Tagalog), consisting of 7 distinct tribes. They occupy the interior, specially the highlands. Mangyans have inhabited the island since pre-history. They are believed to have originally traveled from Indonesia and settled down for good in the island.

A. Iraya - live in Naujan, Baco, San Teodoro, and Victoria in Oriental Mindoro, and in Mamburao, Sta. Cruz, and Sablayan in Occidental Mindoro. 1. Traditionally, Iraya attire was made from dry tree bark, flattened and softened by pounding, The women wore blouses and skirts, while the men wore cloth g-strings. Today most women wear white one-piece, off-shoulder dresses. 2. Skilled in nito-weaving. Known for their nito baskets, woven into jars, trays, plates, cups and other handicrafts of different sizes and designs.

B. Alangan - live in Naujan, Baco, San Teodoro, and Victoria in Oriental Mindoro, and in Mamburao, Sta. Cruz, and Sablayan in Occidental Mindoro. 1. Women wear a skirt made of long strips of woven nito, wound many times around the lower half of the body. A pounded bark g-string keeps what looks like a "slinky," from falling. The upper covering is made from the leaf of the wild buri palm. For modesty, single girls also wear a red kerchief over this strapless ulango. Men wear woven cloth g-strings with fringes in front. 2. At the middle part of their houses is a "square-like box" which they call palangganan, built one foot lower than the floor. This is used as a fireplace. In an Alangan communal house called balay-lakoy (big house), where about 8-20 nuclear families live, the number of palangganan shows the number of families living in the balay-lakoy. 3. Known for their striking female outfit, rattan weaving and house design

C. Tadyawan - found only in Oriental Mindoro: Naujan, Victoria, Socorro, Pola, Gloria, Pinamalayan, and Bansud. 1. Traditionally, the women wound a red cloth around their chests, and wore a white skirt together with colorful beaded bracelets or necklaces. The men wore g-strings. At present, women are rarely seen wearing their traditional attire, though several men still wear g-strings. 2. Known as skilled hat weavers.

D. Tau-buid - live in Socorro, Pinamalayan and Gloria in Oriental Mindoro, but most of them live in Sablayan and Calintaan in Occidental Mindoro. 1. Standard dress for men and women is the loincloth. In some areas near the lowlands, women wrap a knee-length cloth around their bark bra-string, while some men wear cloth instead of bark. Both sexes wear bark cloth as inner clothing and for headbands, women's breast covers, and blankets. Cloth is made by extracting, pounding and drying the inner bark of several different trees. 2. Known as pipe smokers (even the children begin smoking at a young age) and basket weavers.

E. Bangon - live along the Binagaw River and the surrounding mountains within the municipalities of Bongabong, Bansud, and Gloria in Oriental Mindoro and in Calintaan, San Jose, and Rizal in Occidental Mindoro. 1. Men wear bahag (loincloth), but no recorded traditional attire for women who most likely wore bark cloth like their Tau-buid neighbors. 2. Hunters and farmers who make pipes and winnowing baskets. 3. Formerly considered a subgroup of the Tau-buhid Mangyans, the Bangons insisted on being a separate group because of distinctions in their culture, language, and writing system.

F. Buhid - live in Oriental (Roxas, Bansud, Bongabong and Mansalay) and Occidental (San Jose and Rizal) Mindoro 1. Women wear woven black and white upper coverings and black and white skirts. Unmarried women wear body ornaments such as braided nito belts; blue thread earrings; beaded headbands, bracelets, and long necklaces. Men wear g-strings; tight chokers; or long beaded necklaces and bracelets. Both sexes use a bag for personal items such as combs and knives. 2. Known for their pre-Spanish syllabic writing system; and pottery

G. Hanunuo - the largest and best known of the 8 groups, they live in Mansalay, Bulalacao, and Bongabong in Oriental Mindoro, and in San Jose, Occidental Mindoro.
1. Men wear a bahag and jacket-style shirt; women indigo-dyed ramit skirts which they weave on back strap looms. Their hand-sewn tops are embroidered on the back with a cross-shaped design called pakudos. Both sexes wear twilled rattan belts with pockets around their waist. Men wear their hair long, tied at the back of the head with a cloth band. Women decorate their long hair with beaded headbands. They are fond of wearing beaded bracelets and necklaces. The pakudos design is also found in their jewelry and embroideries, and woven into their baskets and bags made of buri palm leaf and nito black fern.
2. Skilled weavers of cotton and buri, and in blacksmithing.
3. Best known for carving poetry (ambahan) on bamboo plants and slats, in their pre-Spanish syllabary script which is Indic in origin. Also known for their black and beige baskets and their pakudos design.

Transportation

Tricycles, multicabs, busses and jeepneys traverse the national access roads from the Calapan port through the city proper and to other municipalities.

A number of vans offer door-to-door direct transport and cargo services from some of the municipalities to Metro Manila. PUVs and tricycles serve passengers within short distance trips or just within the town proper.

Infrastructure

Airport
Calapan City has an airport, Lazareto Airport also known as Calapan Airport. It is an airport serving the general area of Calapan, Oriental Mindoro, Philippines. It is classified as s secondary airport by the Air Transportation Office. It is currently being used by small aircrafts and helicopters for scheduled charter flights.

Seaport
The Port of Calapan is the main port serving Oriental Mindoro and plays an important role in the transport of general and RORO cargoes, and passengers to other provinces. The port is a reinforced concrete general purpose wharf, primarily operated using the RORO facilities. Chief commodities handled at the port are copra, rice and other agricultural products for outbound cargo, cement, fertilizer and general commodities for inbound cargo. It has a total area of 32,116 square meters.

It is about 1.5 kilometers from the existing Calapan airport. It is 22 nautical miles southward from Batangas City. Sea distance to Manila is 104.3 nautical miles. It is located at lat 13?25.8' N, long 121?11.8'E. Via RORO, the average travel time is 2 hours from Batangas City port and vice versa while fast craft ferry has an average travel time of 45 minutes from Batangas City port and vice versa.

Road network Roads are constructed using a combination of concrete, asphalt, gravel and earth. Several bridges (small and big) span various creeks and rivers built mostly of concrete and steel on the national road and barangays.

The Municipality of Roxas in Oriental Mindoro is now serving as gateway to other destinations such as San Jose, Occidental Mindoro, Boracay, Romblon and Palawan. Pinamalayan is a jump-off point to Marinduque and Puerto Galera is the identified alternative route.

The road network of 919 kilometers of Manila-Iligan via Dapitan runs along the major islands of Luzon (Manila, Cavite, Batangas), Oriental Mindoro (Calapan, Roxas), Panay (Caticlan, Kalibo, Ivisan, Iloilo), Negros (Bacolod, Pulupundan, Kabangkalan, Bais, Dumaguete) and Mindanao (Dapitan, Dipolog, Ozamis, Iligan).

Power
The 9.5 MW Diesel Power Plant, 25 MW diesel generating sets, 32 MW modular diesel power plant of NAPOCOR (National Power Corporation) and distributed by Oriental Mindoro Electric Cooperative, Inc. (ORMECO) and ORMECO's 1.2 MW at Dulangan Mini-Hydro Power Plant. Potential energy resources of the province include coal, wind farm, geothermal and hydropower. o    Water The 15 level III systems from the water districts of Naujan, Calapan Waterworks Sytem and Development Corporation (CWSDC), Pinamalayan, Pola and Roxas, 6 municipal waterworks and 5 barangay waterworks. Banking and Financial Institutions

Commercial banking institutions being operated within the province are the branch offices of Land Bank of the Philippines, Philippine National Bank, UCPB, DBP, Metrobank, BPI and PCI-Equitable Bank. Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) are also available at the said banks. Western Union provides money transfer services.

Various large and small credit institutions are also being operated in all municipalities.

Economy

Annual per capita income (in Philippines Pesos, excludes Calapan Mindoro) 24,096 or USD550 as of February 2011.

Oriental Mindoro is also known as the Rice Granary and Fruit Basket of Southern Tagalog. It still is the Banana King and Calamansi King of the region.

The province of Oriental Mindoro is a major food supplier of Southern Tagalog. They are known to be one of the top producers of rice, banana and calamansi. Other agricultural products produced in the province are coconut and corn. The surrounding forests of the island are the best source of indigenous raw materials such as rattan, vines, and buri.

Light industries such as marble works, metal works, ceramics, handicrafts and houseware manufactures can thrive with the availability of raw materials within the province.

Tourism is a bright prospect. There are also opportunities in developing national parks like Lake Naujan, and Mount Halcon into eco-tourism resort areas.

Fishing
Fishing is considered to be a profitable industry in the province. The aquaculture consists of brackish water fisheries, freshwater fisheries and sea farming. The Fishery resources are classified as marine or aquaculture. There are 13 coastal towns that have excellent fishing grounds which yield commercial species of fish like tuna, mackerel, snapper, anchovy, and round scad. The fishing season starts from the month February until October, although the commercial activity can be carried out all year round.

Mineral Resources
The island of Mindoro is gifted with abundant deposits of metallic and non-metallic minerals. Quantities of mineral substances include gold, copper, silver, iron, copper, and chromite while non-metallic consist of silica, coal, barite and marble deposits. Barite deposits can be found in Mansalay and Roxas. The municipalities of Puerto Galera, San Teodoro and Baco are rich with marble deposits while silica and sand can be sourced in Manansalay. Reserves of gold and silver can be found in San Teodoro and Puerto Galera.

Tourism
The white sand beaches, crystal clear water, and the diversity of flora and fauna in Mt. Halcon and magnificent waterfalls made the province the "emerging eco-tourism destination".

Agriculture
The bulk of outward merchandise of Oriental Mindoro consists of rice, banana, calamansi, livestock and poultry and fish products. Notably, Oriental Mindoro is the region's top producer of palay with an annual production of 318,858 metric tons or yields 36% of the total regional produced in 2007 in which 245,362 metric tons were harvested from irrigated farms and 73,496 metric tons of palay were harvested from rainfed farms. Oriental Mindoro is also the top producer of calamansi in MIMAROPA in which 120,249.91 metric tons were harvested or 99% of the total regional produced in 2007. The top calamansi suppliers are from the municipalities of Naujan, Socorro and Victoria. Other major products include corn, coconut, vegetables, fruits like rambutan, marang or uloy, lanzones and durian.

Telecommunication

The use of computers through Internet, Telefax, cellular phones (powered by Globe, SMART and Sun) and sometimes, two-way radios are popular not only in the households but also among students/schools and businesses with operations in the interior of the provinces; local telecommunication is being serviced by Calapan Telephone System, Inc. (CATSI). Mail handling or postal /courier services are provided by RCPI and LBC aside from the post offices located in each municipality.

There are about 10 offices handling social telegraph 10 services.

Telephone Services
Calapan Telephone System, Inc. (CATSI) covers the area of: Calapan City, Roxas, Bongabong, Victoria, Pinamalayan, Socorro,

Bansud, Gloria, and Puerto Galera while Globe Telecom covers: Calapan City, Socorro, Bongabong, Naujan, Puerto Galera, Victoria, Pinamalayan, and Roxas.

Cellular Services
Smart Telecommunications, Inc cellsites are located at Calapan City and Puerto Galera, Naujan, Pinamalayan, Roxas and Bongabong while Globe Telecom cell sites at Calapan, Puerto Galera and Roxas.

There is one AM and eight FM staions but, DZSB 104.1 SPIRIT FM, the only FM Catholic radio station in the territory. Although some radio and TV stations can be heard / seen by a relay broadcast from its Manila station. Two television networks Tamaraw Vision Network, Inc. and Calapan Cable TV Network service the territory.

Topography

The province's varied topography is dominated by rugged mountain ranges from the west and fertile valleys towards the eastern coast. The Mount Halcon range runs from north to south and serves as the province's natural boundary with Occidental Mindoro. Mt. Halcon at 2,586 meter is the fourth highest peak in the Philippines. Lake Naujan is in the northern part of the province. The plains stretch from Baco, Calapan, Naujan and Victoria in the north, Pinamalayan and Bongabong in the middle, and Roxas to Mansalay in the south.

The province belongs to the island of Mindoro under MIMAROPA region in Luzon divided into two (2) Congressional Districts, 14 municipalities: Baco, San Teodoro, Puerto Galera, Naujan, Victoria, Socorro, Pola, Pinamalayan, Gloria, Bansud, Bongabong, Roxas, Mansalay,Bulalacao, one (1) City: Calapan City and 426 barangays (villages).

Education

Literacy rate (simple literacy) 88.05 percent

Institutions of Higher Learning
The city is host to numerous higher education institutions. The Divine Word College of Calapan (DWCC), a Catholic college run by the Divine Word Missionaries is currently the largest institution of higher learning in the city and the province of Oriental Mindoro. Other private institutions of higher learning include the St. Anthony College - Calapan City (Information Technology, Nursing & Tourism), Luna Goco Medical Center and Colleges (Nursing and Medicine), Southwestern Luzon Maritime Institute Foundation and Filipino Academy of Scientific Trades (Maritime Studies), AMA Computer Learning Center (Information Technology), and CLCC Institute of Computer Arts and Technology (Information Technology).

There are currently two public higher educational institutions in the city. One is the Mindoro State College of Agriculture and Technology. The other is the City College of Calapan which was opened last June 2008 through the initiative of City Mayor Salvador Leachon.

Basic Education
Calapan City has seven national high schools (NHS), the largest of which is the Leido Memorial National High School (LEMNAHIS). Other public high schools include the Ceriaco Abes Memorial National High School (MNHS), Parang NHS, Canubing NHS, Managpi NHS, Pedro V. Panaligan MNHS, the Community Vocational High School, and the LEMNAHIS Bucayao Annex. The Catholic Church also runs the Holy Infant Academy, while DWCC also maintains a basic education department.

Public elementary schools are organized into three districts. They are the Calapan West, Calapan South and Calapan East Districts.

Culture

MANGYAN CONTRIBUTIONS

A. Hanunuo and Buhid Scripts - Together with the Tagbanwa and Palaw'an scripts from Palawan, these four pre-Hispanic scripts were declared National Cultural Treasures in 1997, and inscribed in the Memory of the World Registers of UNESCO in 1999. Like RP (Republic of the Philippines) neighbors, these are Indic-derived ancient scripts.

B. Ambahan - A rhythmic poetic expression with any number of seven-syllable lines and rhyming end-syllables. Often chanted without musical accompaniment, its purpose is to allegorically express life experiences through entertainment while educating the youth on various customs such as courtship, decorum and death.

C. Urukay - is another form of Mangyan poetry using mostly 8-syllable lines and a more recent vocabulary originating from the Bisaya. It has musical accompaniment and is sung with a distinct melody, the style varying from individual to individual. The Urukay is often performed during courtship, or to bring cheer to other occasions such as feasts and litigation meetings.

Harvest Festival
The Harvest Festival, celebrated on March 21 along with the city's founding day was conceptualized by the city government council in recognition of Calapan City's achievement as one of the major exporter of rice in the Philippines. The city was once an importer of rice but now rice is the most important export of Calapan. According to city statistics, the increase in palay production is attributed to the improvement of the city's agricultural programs.

Sinkaw Festival
The Sinkaw Festival derives its name from "sining kalabaw" or carabao arts, a creative artistic painting competition with no less than the carabaos as "canvasses." This festival honors the city's native "beasts of the burden" as an eternally indispensable partner in farming and, essentially, a special tribute to the farmers' industry.

Kalap Festival (Calapan City Foundation Day, March 21)
The festival commemorates the founding anniversary of the City of Calapan highlighted by street dancing and colorful float parade depicting the history of Calapan and the origin of its name from which the festival derived its name. A merry mixture of socio-civic, cultural, historical and sports activities are part of the run of events.

Sto. Niño de Calapan Festival (City Fiesta, January 1) Calapan City celebrates its Fiesta on New Year's Day. Fiesta activities begin during the first week of December with a series of religious activities. The celebration extends towards the Christmas season laced with nightly cultural presentation, yuletide activities topped by the lighting of the giant Christmas tree and fireworks, as well as agro-industrial and tourism fairs.

Mardi Gras (Fiesta, Foundation Day, Summer, Halloween)
The ultimate street party that takes place along the entire stretch of J. P. Rizal Street. The hypnotic lights and upbeat music, together with various fun-filled activities, will bring together a bevy of party-goers to party the night away.

Friday Night sa Bagong Calapan
Sit back and relax by watching free movies. Groove through the night with the various bands filling the evening with rhythm and beats. With the good music, food and drinks, paint the town red, Calapan style.

Bahag-Hari Festival, April 24, Pinamalayan, Oriental Mindoro
Colorful celebration highlighted by street dancing, a parade of float and a different Moriones Festival.

Kapakyanan Festival of Victoria September 18, in Victoria, Oriental Mindoro
Although the main agricultural crop is rice, a great portion of the town's land is planted with citrus and tropical fruits like rambutan, lanzones, and durian. These fruits are shipped in large quantities to Metro Manila and neighboring provinces. Victoria is presently known as the "fruit basket "of Oriental Mindoro. Kapakyanan Festival is a fruit festival highlighting the abundance of fruit produce of the town. Kapakyanan is a Mangyan term which means "kasaganaan" or abundance.

Pamugu-an Festival, 3rd week of October; Mansalay, Oriental Mindoro
It is a festive reunion of different Mangyan tribes. There are sports events, such as the Palaro ng Lahi, cultural presentations, product demonstrations, and "Barakalan" or "baratillo" or sale of native products.

Sanduguan Festival, Calapan City, Oriental Mindoro
Sanduguan revives the barter trade between the Mai natives and the Chinese traders. This week-long festivity features an agro-trade fair. There is a historical parade, re-enactment of the barter trading, and the Indakan sa Sanduguan, a street dancing competition. Considered as the biggest and the most innovative festival in the province, it also features art and historical contests, workshops, and contemporary and ethnic cultural shows.

Eastern Visayas seminarians gather for philosophical conference

Eastern Visayas seminarians gather for philosophical conference Guided by the theme ‘Philosophy and Literature’, the conference aims to gather seminarians who are undergoing their philosophical-formation years.