Christian groups rail against World Council of Churches

Protesters accused WCC of ungodliness for keeping in touch with other faiths and for many liberal social values it espouses.

Korea
Nov 04 2013, 6:35 PM
Christian groups rail against World Council of Churches
Protestors opposed to the World Council of Churches meet outside the BEXCO convention center in Busan, South Korea.

More than 1,000 Christians belonging to 71 churches shouted, ‘down with World Council of Churches’, and sang hymns last Tuesday outside a convention centre in Busanto protest against a multi-religious meet organised every seven years by WCC.

Protestors accused WCC of ungodliness for keeping in touch with other faiths and for many liberal social values it espouses.

One protester told Ecumenical News, WCC was "tainted by pluralism" by what he termed was embracing different gods, communism, homosexuality and other lifestyles.

“Religious pluralism is heresy, denying the authority of the Bible, and is an Anti-Christ scheme aimed at rooting out Christianity," Song Chun-gil, a representative of the group told the Korea Herald newspaper on October 24.

WCC sees building bridges between Christians and Muslims essential to stem several conflicts in West Asia and parts of Africa. The general secretary of the World Council of Churches, Reverend Olav Fykse Tveit, is trying to get leaders of all main faiths living in Syria to come together when political leaders meet in Geneva later in November.

Days before the WCC Assembly in Busan, a peace train arrived in Busan from Berlin on October 28 for promoting peace on the Korean Peninsula.

Part of the WCC's inclusiveness is to act as a peace broker for the nation that has remained divided in North and South since inconclusive end of the Korean War in 1953.

Around 5,000 people participated in the WCC meet, representing 560 million Christians from mainly Anglican, Orthodox, traditional Protestants and Pentecostal churches.

Source: Ecumenical News

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