Conscience best place to visit during Lent: Archbishop Villegas

Many people today are no longer in touch with their conscience, so this Holy Week, they must make time to be alone and listen to their inner feelings.

Philippines
Apr 16 2014, 1:51 PM
Conscience best place to visit during Lent: Archbishop Villegas
Archbishop Socrates Villegas of Lingayen-Dagupan

“The best place to make a pilgrimage is not even a church. The best place to go is your conscience and allow the voice of right and wrong to prevail,” Archbishop Socrates Villegas of Lingayen-Dagupan said in a recent interaction with reporters.

“Many people today are no longer in touch with their conscience so this Holy Week, they must make time to be alone and listen to their inner feelings,” said Archbishop Villegas, President of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP).

Villegas also reminded the faithful that making sacrifices and doing charity work should not stop when Lent ends at Easter, as the Christian life meant prayer, sacrifice and charity throughout the year.

“Lent just highlights it, so to speak. Lent just [puts] the spotlight on these three … But outside Lent — during Easter, during Christmas — we should still be praying, sacrificing and doing charity for others. That’s the real discipleship of Christ,” he said.

As for those who will sing the Passion of Jesus Christ, or “Pasyon,” this Holy Week, they should stick to the traditional way of singing it and not render it to the tune of modern songs, said Father Conegundo Garganta, executive secretary of the CBCP’s Episcopal Commission on Youth.

The Pasyon is a uniquely Filipino tradition where people sing the story of the suffering, death and resurrection of Jesus from Holy Monday to Good Friday.

Garganta said it was not every day that people sing or listen to the Pasyon, unlike popular songs, which they hear every day.

“These modern songs are just there every day, so the Pasyon should be different, at least during this period when we should be in solemn prayer,” he said.

Garganta said the traditional way of singing the Pasyon helped people to reflect and pray. Many of those who take part in the marathon, mostly adults, do it as penance.

But in recent years, the Pasyon has been treated with irreverence, singing the lyrics to pop, rock or hip-hop tunes to attract young people to the tradition.

While the Church does not frown on the innovation, it reminds the faithful not to lose sight of the deeper meaning of the life, death and resurrection of Jesus.

Source: Philippine Daily Inquirer

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