Filipino Cardinal reminds about Oblates' work

The first cardinal from Mindanao was leading the feast day mass of Sto. Niño (Holy Child) parish in Midsayap, North Cotabato.

Philippines
Jan 20 2014, 3:39 PM
Filipino Cardinal reminds about Oblates' work
Cardinal-elect Orlando Quevedo.

Cardinal-elect Orlando Quevedo, a member of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI), wants his people to be grateful to the missioners and church workers who established the first OMI-aided parish in the Philippines.

The first cardinal from Mindanao was leading the feast day mass of Sto. Niño (Holy Child) parish in Midsayap, North Cotabato.

He said OMI missioners established the parish 75 years ago as the first parish in the undivided Cotabao Empire. The empire was later divided into provinces of Cotabato, South Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat and Maguindanao.

Cardinal-designate Quevedo, 75, also archbishop of Cotabato said the feast of Holy Child is a celebration of religious faith, not only in the Philippines but for Catholics all over the world.

Over the weekend, thousands gathered in this rice producing town for the feast, which is known as Halad (Offering) Festival. It has been a tradition among Catholics here to prepare food for guests as a symbol of offering to the patron saint.

Cardinal reminded the parishioners to remember the OMI missionaries who established the parish, more particularly Fr. Egide Beaudion, who was among the seven OMI pioneers who arrived in the country along with Fr. Gerard Mongeau who later became the first bishop of Cotabato.

He also asked people not to forget other OMI missionaries who served the parish. In a special way, he asked people to remember Bishop Ben de Jesus, who was gunned down in Jolo.

Quevedo also acknowledged the work of religious sisters and lay missioners. "Let us be grateful to the first lay leaders of Midsayap after the World War," he said. He credited them for the enthusiasm among lay leaders of today.

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