Jesuits initiate measure to curb global warming

Once a participant confirms participation, they are given a code number, which applies to a particular tree already planted somewhere in Cambodia.

Cambodia
May 01 2014, 2:14 PM
Jesuits initiate measure to curb global warming
Participants of the Jesuit carbon offset programme in Cambodia.

Jesuits in Cambodia have initiated a programme that will allow air travellers to compensate for the air pollution they have indirectly caused. The money collected from the travellers would be used to plant trees that would help retain the natural ratio and quality of air.

Participants of the Carbon Offset Programme have to furnish details such as airplane route, list of transiting airports to and from Cambodia. Based on this, a passenger’s approximate carbon dioxide emission is calculated using International Civil Aviation Organization standards.

The number of trees and their life span to absorb the emissions of that particular trip is calculated based on the average amount of carbon stored in native hardwood trees in Cambodia. The cost of planting and maintaining the specific number of trees to absorb their emissions is then deducted from the traveller.

Once a participant confirms participation, they are given a code number, which applies to a particular tree already planted somewhere in Cambodia.

“Customers will be able to identify their trees and track their growth through periodically updated pictures on our website soon. To date, we have 51 patrons, who have given a total of $482.60 to the programme,” said Father Gabriel (Gabby) Lamug-Nanawa, who is part of the Ecology Programme team of Jesuit Service Cambodia.

The programme primarily intended for Jesuits within the country, volunteers and visiting friends, will be carried out in conjunction with a seedling nursery set up in late 2012 in Banteay Prieb, a Jesuit-run vocational school for people with disabilities.

The growing of seedlings has now become an integral part of Banteay Prieb’s curriculum. In 2013, 22 agricultural students with disabilities spent three weeks of their school year in the nursery, learning about the techniques used in growing different native hardwood trees from seeds.

The nursery project has grown considerably in the last year.  In May 2013, the nursery had nearly 2,000 seedlings of seven species of Cambodian hardwood trees. Today, there are nearly 10,000 seedlings of 17 species.

“Hopefully, the year to come will bring further growth in new respects,” said Father Gabby. “We are not a big operation, but we value all the young trees we plant, for we believe that in every seedling that survives is a forest awaiting.”

Source: sjapc