JRS Cambodia celebrates World Interfaith Harmony Week

The participants at the event promised to work together for justice, peace and a development that sustains all especially the poorest and most excluded.

Cambodia
Apr 01 2014, 3:43 PM
JRS Cambodia celebrates World Interfaith Harmony Week

People of different faiths gathered for an interfaith event organised by the Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS Cambodia) at Mindol Metta Karuna on February 8 to mark the World Interfaith Harmony Week.

The participants at the event promised to work together for justice, peace and a development that sustains all especially the poorest and most excluded.

They were asked to think about what they could do for a world of justice and peace and choose one of the following activities: to be peaceful in your family or school; to plant trees and look after cleanliness of your environment; to help people have a country to live in; to make life easier for a handicapped person; or to campaign for Cambodia to ban cluster bombs.

JRS Cambodia also launched a booklet titled “Plant a Tree: Stories of People Caring for Environment”. The booklet is a result of the Interfaith Environment Workshop they had organized for Buddhists, Christians, Muslims and Minority Groups in June 2013.

Sister Denise Coghlan, Director of JRS Cambodia, said that the workshop had been inspired by Nao Sok, who has planted trees all over Cambodia. He was inspired to begin his work after seeing photos of starving people in Africa, affected by drought without trees. Cambodia could have the same suffering.

JRS Cambodia hopes that the stories in the booklet will inspire readers to care for the environment.

In his story on interfaith cooperation for sustainability development, Ernst Jurgensen wrote, “practically and symbolically the planting of a tree can bring people from various religious groups together for a common cause, for instance, sustainable development. All Cambodians regardless of faith are affected adversely by deforestation, so there is a need to initiate collaboration across faith boundaries; in local communities, between religious institutions and top leaders. The engagement and cooperation of all levels of religious communities is pivotal in promoting a new path of sustainable development. Only by working together for sustainable development can Cambodia’s forests be saved before it is too late.”

Source: sjapc.net

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