Parish to give free baptism to babies with Joseph-inspired names

The Catholic Church is celebrating the feast of St. Joseph the Worker on May 1, which coincides with International Labour Day.

Philippines
Apr 25 2014, 6:44 PM
Parish to give free baptism to babies with Joseph-inspired names
San Jose Manggagawa Parish Church in Manuguit.

San Jose Manggagawa Parish Church in Manuguit of Manila’s Tondo area is offering free baptism on May 1, the feast day of St. Joseph the Worker, to new-born babies with their christening name as Joseph or its variants.

“All children to be christened Joseph or other names derived from it like Jose, Josefa, Josefina, and Josephine are entitled to a free baptism on May 1,” Father Bobby R. Titco, parish priest said.

The Parish was founded in July 1966 and falls under the canonical jurisdiction of the Archdiocese of Manila. It caters to the spiritual needs of Manuguit, Obrero and Antipolo residents that are Tondo communities with large labourer population, which explains the choice of name for the parish as San Jose Manggagawa (English translation, St. Joseph the Worker).

Manila Archbishop, Cardinal Luís Antonio G. Tagle, will be celebrating mass at 6.30 p.m. on April 30, the eve of the “town fiesta”.

Father Titco said the feast day will begin with two masses, during which all labourers and the tools they use in their trade will be blessed.

The two highlights of the day’s celebrations are a mass wedding and a mass christening functions hosted by the parish.

The rest of the day, there will be an ongoing “Palarong Pinoy 2014”, traditional Filipino games, to be organized by the San Jose Manggagawa Parish Ministry for Youth Affairs.

“All parishioners — children, teens, adults, even seniors — are encouraged to join the games,” the priest said.

The “town fiesta” will end with a high mass at 5 p.m., celebrated by Auxiliary Bishop Bernardino Cortez of Manila.

The Catholic Church celebrates the feast of St. Joseph the Worker on May 1, which coincides with International Labour Day.

The New Testament Gospels of Matthew and Mark identify St. Joseph, the husband of the Blessed Virgin and foster father of Jesus, as a tekton, a Greek word meaning “manual labourer” or “handyman”, but traditionally translated into English as “carpenter”.

Jesus, following the Jewish custom of the day, became a carpenter like Joseph. Early church martyr Father Justin, who had lived in the second century of the Christian era, wrote that Jesus made yokes and ploughs for farming.

Source: CBCP News

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